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Museveni: Why I Won’t Retire Soon

President Museveni answers Bazzukulu's children on his way to Japan. PPU Photo

Uganda’s president Yoweri Museveni has said he would enjoy his retirement but explained why he won’t leave power soon.

In a full statement containing answers to questions from social media users, written aboard the presidential jet on his way to Japan for the seventh edition of the Tokyo International Conference for African Development (Ticad) summit, Museveni said he had all he needed to have a wonderful retirement.

A social media user named Horan Nsubuga had urged Museveni to retire and become “Father of the Nation”.

But Museveni said he still needed to support efforts to transform Africa.

“My retirement has never been a problem because I will be very comfortable in my retirement: Rwakitura, Kisozi, Ntungamo. I lack nothing and I have never lacked anything after my father supported my education,” Museveni responded to Nsubuga.

“What needs support is Africa, Uganda included.”

Museveni then reminded Nsubuga of a speech he made at Ticad in 2016 in which he explained the “10 strategic bottlenecks that are crucial for the transformation of Africa and, even, our survival as free people”.

The president listed these bottlenecks as: Ideological disorientation, weak states and weak Armies, undeveloped human resource, poor infrastructure, fragmented markets and political landscape, and exporting raw materials only.

Other bottlenecks, according to Museveni, are undeveloped agriculture, undeveloped services, stifling of the private sector and lack of democracy.

With the tone in his response changing, Museveni lambasted politicians who were oblivious of the danger Africa faced if these bottlenecks weren’t dealt with.

“Why don’t political actors, if they really care about Africa, talk about these issues in addition to talking about Museveni’s retirement?” wondered Museveni.

“I am not impressed by any so-called leader or actor, who does not see this danger and it has always been our conviction and our duty to wake up the Africans, work for their unity so as to insure our future.”

The president emphasized that he would keep in power as long as these bottlenecks remained – and as long as he had the mandate of Ugandan voters.

“This is what keeps me in active politics as long as the Ugandan people support me.”

Museveni has been in power since 1986 when he took power following a five-year war that claimed hundreds of thousands of lives.

Now in power for 33 years, Museveni, in his inaugural speech at the steps of parliament, diagnosed Africa’s problem as leaders who overstayed in power.

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